Hewitt RobertsBehavior based safety, Construction safety, EHS Software, Inspection management, Safety audits, Safety data, Safety inspection, Safety management, Safety observation, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


In this blog series we’ll be looking at safety in the construction industry. Construction is one of the most danger-prone industries there is – responsible for approximately 1 in 5 workplace fatalities. How can construction companies successfully create a safety program and achieve buy in? We’ve spoken with industry professionals Steve Mellard, National Safety Director at Anning Johnson and Desire’e Ropel, Safety Manager at Hermanson to get an insider look into how to manage safety in the construction industry.

Construction safety briefing

Construction Industry Safety Importance

 The construction industry poses unique health and safety challenges. In fact, 1 out of every 5 workplace deaths were in the construction. Luckily health and safety processes play a vital role in minimizing risks. And while the construction industry is heavily regulated (see OSHA & CFCSA), having a safety program in place to make sure these processes are being followed is a major challenge for the industry as a whole.

Here are 4 issues to consider when looking to improve safety on construction jobsites.

  1. Create a Safety-First Workplace Culture

Having a safety-first work culture is one of the top ways that construction companies can keep workers safe on the jobsite. And while your own company culture can be strong and safety-oriented, new workers may not share the same values. Getting personnel from other companies and cultures comes with unique challenges: old-school values and cutting corners may be the norm for some employees who don’t yet understand the importance of “doing it right”.

  1. Provide Consistent and Regular Safety Training

Desire’e Ropel, Safety Manager at Hermanson, points to consistency of training as a key factor to a successful safety program. Even when a safety item may seem like common knowledge, consistent training and reinforcement from top-level management is crucial to make sure that safety procedures are top of mind.

  1. Have Realistic Budgets and Deadlines

Construction companies are constantly under pressure to meet project deadlines on time and in budget – it’s the nature of the business. However, when budgets and schedules are tight – or tighter than you expected – it is often safety that takes the hit when working under pressure. Safety often takes a back seat in the minds of front-line managers and workers when racing against the clock. Just as you wouldn’t speed through a crowded school zone because you are late going somewhere, giving safety management the short shift because a project is running over schedule could end in disaster. Given the nature and number of  hazards on a job-site, even the slightest oversight can be catastrophic.

  1. Consider “The Human Factor”

Steve Mellard from Anning Johnson cites the “human factor” as one of the key factors to consider when thinking safety as it contributes to – or is associated with – almost all incidents. Employees can make poor choices knowing full well that their actions could be detrimental to their safety – and/or the safety of others. This is why a safety-first workplace culture which reinforces training and rewards safety over risk and time-saved is so important.

Instead of facing potential legal action, fines, and lost productivity, the construction industry should work to ensure they are not falling short when it comes to safety.

In the next blog in our series on construction safety, we’ll cover what a construction safety program must include to be effective.

Next blogs in this series:

  • What Must A Construction Safety Program Include to Be Effective?
  • How Leadership Style Affects Safety Performance in Construction
  • Improving Employee Buy-In & Participation in Your Safety Management Program
  • 5 Significant Safety Issues Facing the Construction Industry
  • #1 Safety Issue in Construction As Told By Top Safety Management Industry Leaders
  • How Has Technology Changed Construction Safety?
  • The Future of Construction Safety – Looking to 2025

Hewitt RobertsCOVID-19 Checklist, Inspection management, Safety inspection2 Comments


Our thoughts go out to all those impacted by the COVID-19 virus worldwide. These are challenging times for all and in an attempt to help our clients and colleagues we have recently published 2 checklists that might help businesses and their employees both prepare for but also manage through an crisis / pandemic outbreak such as with COVID-19 now.

The checklists are:

COVID-19 Crisis / Pandemic Preparedness Checklist for Business

COVID-19 Crisis / Pandemic Outbreak Management and Response Checklist

The first is to help business prepare for a crisis / pandemic such as COVID-19 and the second is aimed at helping business (particularly in ‘public-facing’ office, retail, hospitality or food services settings) reduce the health and safety risk to employees and visitors to a business (customers, clients, etc.).

The checklists can be downloaded in Excel free of charge.

Stay safe in these difficult times!

Hewitt RobertsAudit software, Behavior based safety, Certainty software, EHS Software, Inspection management, Safety inspection, Safety observation, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


New Certainty App!That’s right we’ve just published a brand new version of the Certainty app! Completely rebuilt with Google’s new Flutter Framework technology for mobile app development, this version includes all the features of the earlier Certainty app but:

  • is faster;
  • has easier ‘swipe’ navigation;
  • is easier to use; and,
  • auto saves as you complete checklists!

The move to this new technology also opens up a range of super exciting features that we will steadily roll into the app moving forward! These include:

  • reporting;
  • action management;
  • scheduling;
  • reminders and push notifications; and,
  • countless new answer types such as a bar code reader and map/GPS coordinates!

Maya NikolovskiAudit software, Enterprise software, Inspection management, Safety audits, Safety inspection, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

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Last week we looked at the importance of having a centralized location for software administration. Does the solution you’re evaluating meet this requirement? Let’s move on to the implementation process, and the resources that the provider has to ensure a successful and smooth implementation. 

If a well managed project with clear objectives is a key drivers of project success, then a close second would be a good start to the process itself. Nothing like hitting the ground running.

Just as projects without good leadership and clear objectives will most likely fail, projects that are not implemented well will likely struggle to meet your needs and eventually wither.

So, when considering an enterprise-level solution, ensure that the solution provider has a track record for implementing enterprise-level projects and can offer all the training, tools and support (i.e. onboarding procedures, data upload templates, project reviews) needed to ensure your project will be a success from day one.

Some things to consider:

  • Does the solution provider offer support for initial project implementation and configuration? Is technical support provided (free of charge) and can you submit support requests 24/7?
  • What onboarding / project implementation resources are available (e.g. onboarding procedures and/or implementation guides, training material, initial data upload templates)?
  • What support is offered by the solution provider (e.g. training, configuration, customization)?
  • Does the solution provider offer ‘test’ or ‘sandbox’ environments for initial roll out testing, new releases, user-testing, etc.?

Next week, we’ll concluding our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring the pricing and cost model of the solution. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.

 

Hewitt RobertsCertainty software, EHS Software, Safety audits, Safety inspection, Safety management, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


Learn how a leader in the US Construction industry – Anning Johnson – used Certainty to take their safety management program digital.

Check out their case study to learn more about how they use Certainty for their job site safety inspections to:

  • ensure that all their construction projects are being inspected according to policy and procedures;
  • ensure that industry standards are being met;
  • ensure safety is monitored company wide; and,
  • easily identify areas of the business that may need improvement or additional employee training.

Going with Certainty not only saved money, but it also saved an enormous amount of time and improved efficiency.

Maya NikolovskiUncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

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Last week we looked at the importance of discovering whether the new enterprise software you’re considering meets your organization’s language requirements. Is the solution you’re evaluating a good fit? Let’s move on to the central, corporate-wide administration capabilities of the software. 

Having been in the enterprise-level software industry for decades, we have been involved in hundreds of projects in dozens of industry sectors with companies that are large and small, national and multinational, and leaders and laggards.

Over the years, experience has proven that time and again, when it comes to successful enterprise-level software projects, they all have one key factor in common: they have clear objectives and are well managed to ensure those objectives are met.

Certainty BI Dashboard

 

Data Consistency 

Long term project success will require that at least most of those involved contribute as they are required too but more importantly that the data you collect (for example to reduce risk, improve performance or ensure compliance) is consistent, comparable and accurate both now and as your project develops.

So, when evaluating an enterprise-level solution you should ensure it has the administrative tools to define things like what data is collected and who has access to change data collection requirements and thus ensure you have a framework for data consistency, comparability and accuracy.

Local Configuration

Furthermore, for larger multinational, multilingual, multifaceted companies, while there will always be a need for corporate-level ‘top down’ direction and dictation of the data that must be collected to ensure corporate- level data consistency and comparability, an enterprise-level solution should also provide for country, region, or location-specific additions and modifications to those ‘corporate’ data collection requirements to ensure both the needs of the corporate centre and local operations can meet their reporting and management needs using the same solution.

Control Over Access and Privilege 

Lastly, when it comes to the long-term success of larger enterprise-level software projects, an additional must is the ability for a central corporate-level project manager to define, administer and control the access and privileges that users (and teams of users have). There is nothing worse than the project lead in US deleting the last 3 years of data entered by the team in Europe by mistake because you couldn’t specify – exactly – who has access to what.

From corporate-wide audit and inspection checklists and thus data collection to user access and privileges, without the tools to manage and administer at a corporate-level, it is unlikely that a software solution will remain effective or provide for consistent, comparable and actionable data and reporting.

 

  • Are there features / tools that allow for corporate-wide data collection consistency and comparability?
  • Can the solution be configured to allow for local, regional and national variations without compromising corporate data reporting requirements?
  • Can you administer user access privileges – exactly as needed?
  • Can your own team restrict / configure user access sufficiently to protect data privacy and allow user access for people and teams across your business to do what they need in the solution?

 

Next week, we’ll continue our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring the language requirements of your business. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.

Maya NikolovskiUncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

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Last week we looked at the importance of discovering whether the new enterprise software you’re considering meets your reporting requirements. Does the solution you’re evaluating meet these requirements? Let’s move on to the language requirements of your organization. 

Officially – or unofficially – most companies have a designated corporate ‘operating’ language used for company-wide communication and reporting. However, that doesn’t mean that most companies operate solely in one language.

In fact, many companies today – large and small – operate in numerous countries, cultures and languages. Top business languages worldwide include English, Chinese, Spanish, Arabic,  German, and many more. Large companies are embracing the multilingual trend internally and in their product offerings. Amazon recently announced that Alexa will be available in “multilingual” mode in the US, Canadian and Indian markets. 

So, when considering a software solution that will be used by many across your company, make sure it will work for all users regardless of language.

Furthermore, make sure that the solution doesn’t just offer a multilingual user interface but is truly multi- lingual and will allow your team to use the solution (e.g. complete and report audits or inspections) in their own language.

When considering and enterprise-level solution for your business, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is the product interface offered in multiple languages and those that your business needs?
  • Can you add your own languages and translations to the solution?
  • Can data be collected (e.g. conduct audits and inspections) in any language?
  • Can data be reported (e.g. report audit and inspection results) in any language?

Next week, we’ll continue our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring the central administration capabilities of the software. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.

Maya NikolovskiUncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

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Last week we looked at the importance of discovering whether the new enterprise software you’re considering can be used for multiple purposes. Does the solution you’re evaluating meet these requirements? Let’s move on to the reporting capabilities of the software you’re evaluating for your organization.  

Without a doubt, one of the most important factors to evaluate when considering enterprise-level software is reporting. Are you buying into a solution that has fabulous data entry options, a slick user interface and end- user bells and whistles – but that has limited capability to report the data you have collected?

Beware – all software solutions are not created equal and one of the most important factors to consider is whether the solution will provide you – and all users in your business – with data they need to actually improve compliance, performance and risk management.

Consider the following when it comes to your reporting requirements: 

  • Can you create user-specific dashboards for your own metrics, analytics and graphs or do you have to rely on canned/set reports?
  • Can you report across all audit/inspection data (regardless of where it was in the business it was entered) to get key metrics for your entire business in one view?
  • Does the solution include a business intelligence (i.e. Microsoft PowerBI, Tableau, etc.) analytics tool or do you have to export data or use external third-party reporting tools to generate the aggregated enterprise-level metrics, analytics and reports you will need?Certainty Software BI Dashboard
  • Does the solution allow for enterprise-wide data roll up and drill through reporting? Can you report enterprise-level metrics, analytics and reporting by:
    1. Site (e.g. location, project, store, lab, facility, etc.)
    2. Site Groups (e.g. Business Units, Divisions, Regions, etc.) User
    3. User Groups (e.g. Safety Managers, Contractors, Shifts, etc.)
    4. Checklist (i.e. audit, inspection, observation, etc.) Question Sets
    5. Questions Answers

Certainty Dashboard

  • If the many reporting tools don’t provide what you need, or you have unique/custom reporting requirements, can (and will) the solution provider create custom reports for you?
  • Does the solution offer automated report subscription services that can email reports to those who are not licensed (or regular) users of the system (i.e. Executive Managers, C-level team members, etc.)?

Next week, we’ll continue our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring the language requirements of your business. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.

Maya NikolovskiAudit software, Behavior based safety, Certainty software, EHS Software, Enterprise software, Inspection management, Loss prevention audit, Quality audits, Safety audits, Safety inspection, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

Last week we looked at the importance of customization before considering new enterprise software. Does the solution meet your customization requirements? Let’s move on to the importance of multi-purpose software for your organization. 

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There are many enterprise-level software solutions that have been designed for a single use activity or discipline and will only ever be used for that activity in your business. HR software and financial accounting software are typical examples. 

In these cases, regardless of the people or currencies involved, the processes – and software used to manage them – remains the same across your business. There is likely no applicability for HR or financial accounting software outside of the HR and Finance Departments.

This, however, is not the case for many other enterprise-level solutions.  When considering a solution to solve your team’s (or department’s) problem, you should consider giving it the best chance of buy-in, support and long-term success. Accomplish this by choosing a tool that can easily be configured for your workflow and problem but that can also meet the needs of other teams and departments with similar workflows and problems.

Enterprise-level solutions for assessing, reporting and managing compliance, risk or performance are a great example. The audit and inspection protocols and checklists may change depending on the discipline involved, but the process and workflow is essentially the same.

 You assess compliance, risk or performance against a set of predetermined questions or protocols and rectify/resolve/manage issues and non-conformances identified. The only thing that really changes is the questions and checklists themselves.

As such, when assessing the viability of a software solution to meet the needs of a discipline or department in your business, improve the probability of long-term success by ensuring that the solution you are considering will work for others like you across your business.

If, for example you are looking for an enterprise-level audit and inspection management solution to improve risk, compliance and performance, make sure the solution will work for all of the audits and inspections needs of your business including:

  • Safety Audits (jobsite safety, behavioral based safety, food safety, etc.)
  • Incident Reporting & Investigations
  • Quality Assurance and Control Audits
  • Environmental and Sustainability Audits
  • Supply Chain Compliance Audits
  • Process Control Inspections
  • Cleaning, Inspection and Lubrication (CIL) Inspections
  • Facility and Maintenance Inspections
  • Vehicle and Equipment Inspections
  • Loss Prevention Audits
  • Certification (ISO, GMP, etc.) Audits
  • Risk Assessments
  • Etc…

Next week, we’ll continue our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring the reporting requirements of your business. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.

Maya NikolovskiAudit software, Behavior based safety, Certainty software, Enterprise software, Loss prevention audit, Quality audits, Safety audits, UncategorizedLeave a Comment


We’ve been involved in the design, development and implementation of enterprise- level software for over 20 years, which is why our team of experts put together this 10-part series on evaluating Enterprise-level software. We’ll cover topics ranging from security, data collection and reporting requirements, implementation resources, pricing / cost models and more, to ensure your next enterprise software deployment is a success. You can also download the entire Evaluating Enterprise-level Software whitepaper here

________________________________________

Last week we looked at the importance of knowing your data integration requirements  before considering new Enterprise Software. Does the solution meet your data integration needs? Let’s move on to how the software can be customized for your business. 

When evaluating an enterprise-level software solution for your company, another key factor to consider is customization and the needs of your own team compared to the features of the solution in question.

Customized… or “out of the box” ready for all your needs?

Of course, if customization is not possible, then you must make sure that the solution in question meets virtually all your foreseeable needs right ‘out of the box’. If it doesn’t meet 100% of your needs, make sure that any needs not met i.e. features not available (especially reporting) are not critical to the success of your project

Who will customize the solution?

If, as is the case with most enterprise-level solutions, customization is possible, make sure you understand what can be customised by your own project team and System Administrators and what must be customized by the solution provider themselves. 

Also, in instances where only the solution provider can customize, make sure the scope and cost for that customization are within your budget and ensure that the provider is responsive to your needs and that they can be met in a timely fashion.

Can you access the data you need?

Another key factor related to customization is reporting. While most enterprise-level software solutions now have a wide range of reporting options, the larger the business the more likely you will have unique and unavoidable reporting requirements not met by standard canned report options. From monthly Executive Management Reports to Department-Specific KPI reports, make sure the key data you need can actually be provided and if not, is custom reporting offered to meet your needs?

Can it meet most of the needs of your users over time?

Lastly, and as it is unlikely any enterprise solution will even meet 100% of the needs of 100% of its users – and your needs will likely mature and change over time – you should ensure that at least some customization is possible even if not needed in the earlier stages of your project.

Remember though, when it comes to customization, increased customizability of a software solution typically means an increased level of user training and product knowledge will be required and thus there is ultimately a natural trade off (and inverse relationship between) customizability and ease of use.

Here are some additional things to consider with respect to customization:

  • Does the solution meet 100% of your project’s needs and if not, is customization possible?
  • If customization is possible, how much can your team (i.e. your team’s System Administrators) change on their own and how much must be customized by your solution provider?
  • If your solution provider must do some or all of the customization required, how much do they charge, is that within your project budget and how long will that customization take for delivery?
  • Does the solution provide custom reporting options if needed?
  • Is there a comfortable balance between customizability and ease of use for your team?
  • Can you customize the look and feel of the solution to match that of your company’s own logos and colors to increase user acceptance, uptake and thus project success?
  • Are you able to customize and define that the access privileges your users will need – enterprise-wide? While some enterprise-level solutions let your Administrators define exactly where users have access and exactly what type of access (view, edit, delete) they have, many solutions only allow for the use of canned or set access privileges.

Next week, we’ll continue our series on evaluating enterprise software by exploring whether the software you’re evaluating can be used for multiple purposes. 

Ps. if you want access to the full whitepaper today, you can download it here.